Sean Penn’s New Novel Has Drawn Comparison’s to Some Legendary Literary Figures:

Posted on April 12, 2018 By

Sean Penn has made himself famous for his outstanding performances on screen but he has recently journeyed into a new realm of artistic expression. The release of his new novel Bob Honey Who Just Do Stuff marks a new phase in Penn’s career and it has drawn great praise from critics. The new novel was the topic of a recent interview with Vogue Magazine.

 

When asked how he is and where he is, Sean responds that he is doing great and that he is at home in Los Angeles. The interviewer questions why he is not on his book signing tour and Sean lets him know that he is actually in the middle of it, but it has taken a turn through the LA area. Sean opens up about how the feeling of releasing a new book is different from other creative endeavours he has been involved with in the past because the novel represents him and him alone. With film work, it is obviously a much more collaborative and team process so Sean is enjoying the satisfaction of presenting something to the public that is 100% him.

 

Sean Penn goes further, stating this book was something he really felt he needed to get out, a story he needed to tell. He foresees this being his main outlet for expression in the immediate future as he has another book already in the works after Bob Honey who just do stuff. He has no current plans for any acting roles on the horizon but won’t fully close the door on film. He does let on that there is a movie possibility out there that he would love to direct.

Read the full interview:

https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/features/sean-penn-interview-bob-honey-me-too-w518708

Penn’s new novel has been drawing some very high praise and comparison to works of such noted authors as Hunter S. Thompson, Mark Twain, E.E. Cummings and William Burroughs to name just a few. The work delightfully mocks today’s obsession with branding. Sean Penn finds his book tour, where he is defining his new brand, to be a bit ironic in this sense.

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